Press

Chris Casey

New Mexico Magazine, July, 2019

From Albuquerque, Chris Casey creates both whimsical and precise designs in his ceramics, no two of which are the same.


Ben Muñoz

D Magazine, May, 2019

The “Endless Endeavor” series took him more than a year to complete. Each panel represents a different chapter in the evolution of Muñoz’s family, from the emigration of his paternal grandfather, Alberto, to the birth of his daughters, Jane and Florence.


Terran Last Gun

Santa Fe Reporter, May 29, 2019

As for the decision to use serigraphs (an ink-on-paper technique similar to silk screening, the most famous of which may be Warhol's portrait of Marilyn Monroe or his Campbell's Soup can), Last Gun says the he finds the medium enticing as a piece of labor-intensive fine art, as a way to make multiple original editions by hand, and as a great artistic leveler.


Hecho a Mano Opening

Santa Fe Reporter, March 27, 2019

"What I'm kind of aiming for is summed up in the name of the business: Hecho a Mano; handmade. My aesthetic is fairly intuitive, and I think right now one of the things that's important to me in connecting makers with the objects with the viewer or buyer."


Hecho a Mano Opening

Albuquerque Journal, March 24, 2019

“I think so many times art can get disassociated from its maker,” said Rose. “And we tend to see it in a vacuum because a lot of places don’t connect the artist to the maker. You see the object and it’s great, but somebody made that. So, Hecho a Mano is sort of a call to that ethos. That somebody made this; this was made by hand. I don’t want a lot of things to be under glass. I want people to be able to touch things. I want that connection.”


Daniel Hernández

Santa Fe Reporter, February 5, 2019

"The concept that exists in Mexican culture of death not as something tragic, but as something inherent in us, that exists—that remains reason for celebration," Daniel Hernández says.


Colectivo 1050

New York Times, October 12, 2018

"The act of turning earth into clay and transforming its properties with fire — is one of humankind’s earliest inventions. ...In the Mexican state of Oaxaca City, there are around 70 villages in which the majority of people make and sell pottery. Apart from Santa María de Atzompa, which uses a green glaze, and San Bartolo, where the clay is fired to black, the pottery in this region is simple, drab brown and mostly unadorned: not the kind of thing outsiders get worked up about."